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Treat your feet to the 'Grace' ballet...

Have you ever slipped your hand into a new pair of Italian leather gloves? If you though that felt heavenly, try on a pair of the 'Grace' ballet flat from Thierry Rabotin. At E.G.Geller, we've carried the 'Grace' in our stores for over a decade and for good reason. There would be a lot of upset customers if we didn't. This shoe has been a lifesaver for many of our E.G.Geller patrons. The *sacchetto construction allows the buttery soft leather to wrap the foot while the Nasa Poron cushioned insoles provides cushioning and arch support. And we can't forget to mention the lightweight, shock absorbent rubber outsole. These shoes last for many years and the styling is beyond classic. Pair the 'Grace' with a dress and tights, slacks or even denim. A style like this will take you from day to night. Treat your aching feet to the beautiful 'Grace' shoe from Thierry Rabotin. Offered in over 7 leather options with new colors arriving for spring 2018. Shop the 'Grace' among our entire selection of Thierry Rabotin>>

 

 

*The "sacchetto" working method is a technique which permits the manufacturing of particularly comfortable shoes. This working process according to the rules of the most authentic Italian shoemaking tradition involves up to two hundred steps requiring outstanding skillfulness, experience and competence.

During the sewing stage, the full grain nappa lining is attached like a "sac" along its edge permitting to build a shoe without the rigid components used in most shoes.

The shoe becomes lighter and allows the foot to move naturally. A breathable cushioned material is inserted between the sole and the lining to provide long lasting shock absorption all along the foot.

The flexible construction allows the application of heels requiring the incorporation of the insole and the heel. This "bridge" between the heel and the ball of the foot is built under the insole cushioned with a layer of memory foam that diminishes the pressure on the plantar arch. - www.thierryrabotin.us


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